Protect and Defend

Welcome to my blog, Protect and Defend. You don’t have to understand me. You only have to agree with me. I can live with losing the good fight, but I can not live with not fighting that good fight at all. - Publius

Wednesday, October 18, 2006

What is wrong with the Washington Post?

I get the feeling that the Washington Post not only wants Jim Webb to beat Senator Allen, but with the way they talk about him, I also think they are hoping he will ask them to prom as well.
This is all from today’s paper alone:

Virginia's Senate RaceJames Webb mounts an independent-minded challenge.
Wednesday, October 18, 2006; A20
THE U.S. SENATE race in Virginia…
As Mr. Allen has partially admitted, his wounds in the close race have been mostly self-inflicted and have left a sour taste in the mouths of many Virginians. Still, there is an even better reason to vote against Mr. Allen: Quite simply, he is a mediocre senator whose six years of undistinguished service do not justify rehiring.
His opponent -- former Navy secretary, former assistant defense secretary, former Marine Corps officer and former Republican -- is admirably independent-minded…
An intelligent man with a record of integrity, he has resisted the packaging of political consultants, which can only be a good thing. Those assets, as well as his deep familiarity with military and national security affairs, offer the promise that he would make an able, if unorthodox, U.S. senator…
Mr. Webb, a fine writer, remains in many ways a political work in progress…
His diagnosis of America's widening disparities in wealth and income is on the mark…
Virginians deserve better and more enlightened representation. Mr. Webb offers that hope.

Don't Call Him RedneckJames Webb Hates the Expression, But Is Very Proud of the Culture
Washington Post, Wednesday, October 18, 2006; C01
…There may be few places in the country more foreign to Hollywood than Gate City, Va., and much of Webb's livelihood has been to translate one culture for another. His dad's family came out of these hollows, though Webb grew up on military bases all over the country. Over the course of his career, in books and more recently in screenplays, Webb, 60, has been writing about the dignity of his people -- the gun-loving, country-music-singing, working-class whites of Scotch-Irish descent who fight in wars, staff the nation's factories and shop its Wal-Marts.
…He is best known for the novel he started shortly after that, "Fields of Fire," a book he sweated over and struggled with, writing and rewriting it "seven times, cover to cover," as he likes to say. Drawing on his experience as a Marine company commander in Vietnam, it was published to much acclaim in 1978, when Webb was already serving as counsel to the House Committee on Veterans Affairs.
He went on to become assistant secretary of defense under Ronald Reagan and then secretary of the Navy. When he quit that post in a protest over budget cuts, he added screenwriting and producing to his résumé and spent 2 1/2 years trying to bring American businesses into Vietnam. And he kept writing books. In all, he has written six novels and, most recently, a book of nonfiction about Scotch-Irish culture. (That's not counting an academic book he wrote in law school, about U.S. military strategy in the Pacific.)…
…Webb has studied the migrations of his people, exulting in their fighting history and puzzling over their entrenched poverty. He is himself the product of a long line of military men, and his son Jimmy is a Marine in Iraq…
…one-on-one, Webb can really talk. He breaks into spontaneous, growling recitation of a manly poem called "Do You Fear the Wind?" that he learned from his father, and launches into a disquisition on country music. He critiques the prose of Winston Churchill ("marvelous") and Teddy Roosevelt ("a little over the top"). His manner is relaxed, bordering on incautious. Regarding his early drafts of a particular book, he says (unsenatorially) that "they all sucked."…
He talks about his love of poetry. Yeats. Pound. Dylan Thomas…
Webb's books have continued to be popular. Webb says he receives "well into the six figures" on book advances, and according to a financial disclosure report filed in May in connection with his campaign, he is now worth between $2.2 million and $6.4 million. (The Senate disclosure form requires that candidates list their assets within broad ranges.) He lives in Falls Church with his third wife, Hong Le Webb, a lawyer who was born in Vietnam and escaped with her family after the fall of Saigon.
The novels are all military-themed and their titles pulse with warrior bravado -- "A Sense of Honor," "Something to Die For," "Lost Soldiers." Several have briefly made it onto major bestseller lists, and some have been translated into other languages. Critics have praised his scene-setting and far-ranging, action-packed plots. They've noted that, as one reviewer put it, he is "not just a writer of war thrillers; he is a genuine novelist of ideas," tackling such issues as when it's appropriate (or not) to put soldiers in harm's way…

Webb Is Reluctant To Advertise DutyVeteran Blasts Allen's Public Comments
Washington Post, Wednesday, October 18, 2006; B01
Virginia Democratic Senate candidate James Webb, who was critically wounded as a Marine in Vietnam, said yesterday that he is uncomfortable talking about his personal story even if doing so could help him unseat Republican Sen. George Allen on Nov. 7…
Webb, who has a son serving in Iraq, said he has disagreed with advice from his aides and others who have told him that voters get to know candidates through their personal stories. Although the race is close, polls show that Virginians know more about Allen than Webb. But Webb said it is improper to use military service in an overtly political way…
Since entering the Senate race in February, Webb has attempted to reveal aspects of his life. He is a decorated veteran, a former Navy secretary and a prolific author…
Though he wears combat boots to honor his Marine son Jimmy, Webb rarely talks about his son…
Webb's comments came during an hour-long interview in which he reiterated his desire to serve in the Senate. Allen declined a similar invitation.
But the Republican-turned-Democrat expressed little love for the process required to be elected. Although his campaign advisers and ads have hammered Allen's personal ethics, Webb has often frustrated advisers by refusing to attack Allen personally. Webb said he is uneasy making that case for his candidacy.
"This is not personal, for me, it's not personal," he stressed…
At a news conference yesterday, Webb picked up the endorsement of several high-ranking retired female military officers who praised his efforts as Navy secretary to produce more opportunities for women…

Why doesn’t the Post just call Webb handsome or dreamy too? I actually cut out a lot of these articles, but a lot of what I cut out were just attacks on Allen. The first article was from the Editorial Pages, the second article from the Style Section, and the third article from the Metro Section, but there were all in one edition of the paper.
Someone tell me I am wrong, and this is not a blatant endorsement of a candidate or anything less than an attempt by one of the country’s major newspapers to not report on an election but to influence an election.

3 Comments:

Blogger quakerdave said...

All this does is make me feel better about the race in New Jersey, between a do-nothing rich boy son of a former governor and an under-investigation tool (pick your definition) of the North Jersey Democratic machine.

Some choice. But maybe better than yours.

Thu Oct 19, 10:25:00 PM  
Blogger Publius said...

QD, it is just annoying to have to see in the paper everyday how much the Washington Post wants Webb to win. You know I am going to vote for Allen, and you know I think that the media has a bias towards all things Democratic and Liberal, and to me this is just another example.

Sat Oct 21, 11:55:00 PM  
Blogger quakerdave said...

So buy the Washington Times.

Sun Oct 22, 01:41:00 AM  

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